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Filtering by Tag: Grapevine

Recipe: Crisp Parsnip Latkes

Sarah West

Try this twist on the classic potato latke featuring one of the season's tastiest new arrivals. Parsnips sweeten up with each frosty night and are just starting to reach peak flavor in December. As a bonus, parsnips don't have as much starch as potatoes, so you can skip the soaking and squeezing step.

Makes 24 Latkes, Serves 6

Ingredients

2 pounds (900 grams) medium to large parsnips, peeled & any woody core removed
1 small onion
2 to 4 heaping tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour or potato starch
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
Freshly ground white pepper
2 to 4 large eggs, lightly beaten
Mild oil with a medium-high smoke point, such as grapeseed, sunflower, or avocado, for pan-frying
Coarse finishing salt, such as Maldon sea salt
1 lemon
Optional accompaniments: applesauce, roasted smashed apples and pears and/or crème fraîche
 
1. Using the large holes of a box grater or a food processor fitted with the grating disk, grate the parsnips. You should have about 5 cups (730 grams). The parsnips may discolor slightly as they stand, but don’t worry. Grate the onion on the large holes of the box grater or fit the processor with the metal S blade and grate. It should look like pulp; mince or discard any large onion pieces.

2. In a large bowl, stir together parsnips, onion, 2 heaping tablespoons flour, salt, 1/2 teaspoon baking powder, and a few grinds of pepper. Stir in 2 eggs. If the mixture seems dry, add the remaining flour, baking powder, and eggs.

3. Line 2 or 3 sheet pans with paper towels. Place the prepared pans, the latke batter, a large spoon, and a spatula near the stove. Heat 1 or 2 large skillets over medium heat. Generously film the skillet(s) with oil (not more than 1/4-inch/6 millimeters deep). When the oil is shimmering and a tiny bit of batter sizzles on contact, start spooning in the latke batter, making sure to add both solids and liquid. Using the back of the spoon, flatten each spoonful into a circle 3 to 4 inches (7.5 to 10 centimeters) in diameter. Do not crowd the latkes in the pan. You'll get 4 or 5 latkes in a 12-inch (30.5-centimeter) skillet.


Recipe by Amelia Saltzman.

 

 

Rich "Pumpkin" Pie

Sarah West

This is not a delicate pumpkin pie. It is pie that walks the line between sweet and savory, dessert and main dish; a pastry that you might be tempted to call a meal. It is also (as a lifelong fan of pumpkin pie) the best version I've ever tasted. I made it the first year I grew 'sweet meat' squash - a variety that was developed in Oregon in the early 1900's for its ability to produce meaty, well-storing squash in our relatively cool growing season - and I've never gone back. I have a sweet tooth, you see, but also an aversion to empty calories. This pie is the ultimate answer: a pie that entertains you like a dessert but feeds you like a steak.

'Sweet meat' is perfect for pie because of its clean-tasting flesh - lacking the grassy bitter flavors some find so off-putting in winter squash - and saturated sweetness. Indeed, some individual 'sweet meats' are so sweet you barely need to add sugar. However, any squash or pie pumpkin will do. This recipe takes variable squash sweetness into account - let your own taste be your guide when deciding how much sugar to add.

Since this pie is not about the crust (in fact, its author, Carol Deppe, recommends going without), I leave that part up to you. If you enjoy making crust, use your best recipe. If you don't, save yourself the trouble and use something pre-made.


Makes one 9-inch pie

Ingredients:
3 cups baked, mashed winter squash meat
1 cup duck eggs (or chicken)
1 cup heavy whipping cream
1/2 - 1 1/2 cups light brown sugar, packed
1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice (or make your own blend with cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and a pinch of clove)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 pie dough


1. To prepare the squash meat, choose a variety with starchy (as opposed to watery or stringy) flesh, such as sweet meat, kabocha, hubbard, or pie pumpkin. Cut in half and bake, cut sides down, on a rimmed baking sheet in an oven set at 350-degrees. Bake until tender. Remove from the oven and let cool to room temperature, then scrape the cooked meat out into a bowl. If it seems overly watery (it should be no wetter than a baked sweet potato), place in a cheesecloth-lined colander and let drain for several hours. Store leftover meat in the freezer, or make it into squash soup!

2. Combine the squash and 1/2 cup of the brown sugar. Taste, adding more sugar until it's as sweet as you like it. Stir in the spice mix, vanilla, and salt. In a small bowl, briefly beet the duck eggs to "scramble," then add to the squash mixture and beat with a mixer on low for a few seconds. Add the cream and blend everything into a smooth batter.  

3. Preheat the oven to 350-degrees. Line a 9-inch glass pie pan with the crust dough, crimp the edges, and weight (if you don't have pie weights, a layer of parchment or foil topped with an inch-thick layer of dry beans works just as well). Bake the dough for 12-15 minutes, or until the edges are just starting to turn golden.

4. While the crust is baking, pre-warm the batter by placing the bowl with the squash mixture inside another bowl filled with hot water, stirring occasionally. Refresh the hot water and continue stirring now and then until the squash mixture is lukewarm. This shortens the baking time and helps to insure that the edges and the center of the pie cook more evenly. Pour mixture into the crust shell, stopping when the filling gets within a quarter of and inch from the top of the crust, to allow room for expansion.

5. Place the pie pan in the center of the oven and bake 45-55 minutes, until the filling puffs up like a cake, from the edges to the center, and has a thin golden crust over the top. Remove from oven and place on a rack to cool. Store in the refrigerator until serving. This pie tastes best after a day of rest, meaning you can check it off the list the day before Thanksgiving. 



Based on a recipe from The Resilient Gardener, by Carol Deppe.

Rutabaga and Apple Bisque

Sarah West

Sometimes the best way to explore an unfamiliar ingredient is to pair it with those you already know well. A cross between cabbage and turnips, rutabagas are a curious, old-fashioned seeming root. Unless you like dirty-white, asymmetrical vegetables, they are short on aesthetic appeal. Once cooked, their starchy flesh blooms into its signature golden hue and a decidedly more potato-like fluff than any of their turnip cousins.

With sweet and bitter notes to their flavor profile (the dominance of either quality dependent upon growing conditions), rutabagas benefit from balancing agents, especially butter and cream. This subtle bisque makes deft use of rutabaga's silky texture along with many items available on market shelves right now. Try finishing it with chopped pastured bacon, slivers of raw arugula or Tuscan kale, or, for something truly decadent, picked Dungenness crab meat and a swirl of melted butter.


Serves 6

Ingredients

About 1-1/2 pounds rutabagas
2 tablespoons butter, plus more to finish
1 large leek, white part only, thinly sliced
2 tart apples, cored and sliced
1 small orange-fleshed sweet potato and/or 2 orange carrots, scrubbed and chopped
1/2 teaspoon herbes de Provence
Sea salt
4 to 5 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1/2 cup half-and-half or milk
Freshly ground white pepper

1. Thickly peel the rutabagas and chop them into a rough dice. You should have about 4 cups.

2. Melt the butter in a soup pot over medium-low heat. Add the leek, apples, sweet potato, rutabagas, and herbes de Provence. Season with 1-1/2 teaspoons salt, add 1 cup of the stock, cover, and simmer for about 15 minutes. Add the remaining 4 cups of stock, bring to a simmer, re-cover, and cook until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes, depending on the size of the vegetable pieces.

3. Let the soup cool slightly, then puree in blender and return it to the pot. Add the half-and-half and heat through, but avoid bringing back to a simmer. Taste for salt and season with pepper. Stir in a little extra butter. The soup will be thick, creamy, and delicate. Serve hot.



Based on a recipe from Vegetable Literacy, by Deborah Madison.

Market 'Trick-Or-Treat' Soup

Sarah West

Although this is not how market shopper Lorinda Moholt presented this recipe to me, I couldn't resist giving it a Halloween spin. Think of it like this: you are dressed up as an adult, bag in hand, walking from booth to booth gathering treats (hopefully no tricks) from market vendors that you take home, lay out on the table, and gaze at in awe. The next day you binge on your goodies, chopping them up and turning them into this delicious soup. Coincidentally, it is also the perfect antidote to a candy hangover.

This isn't a traditional recipe with exact amounts or required ingredients. Rather, it offers open-ended advice for turning a wide variety of seasonal produce into an easy soup - one that proves good food does not have to be complicated. All recipes invite you to add your own spin; this one demands it, and then rewards you with the satisfaction of having created something of your own. Thanks to Lorinda for sharing her technique!


Serves as many as you want

1. Make a lovely pot of braised vegetables: garlic, leeks, diced carrots, savoy cabbage, celery, chopped kale or even collards, and any other vegetables waiting to be included. (To braise: cook chopped pieces on low heat in just enough broth to cover them, until they start to soften). Add sugar pumpkin or squash that has been well-cooked in the microwave (or standard oven), scooped out, and whirled in the food processor with some chicken broth.  

2. Season with salt and pepper, some curry and/or cumin and add more broth. If you have left over beans or frekkah (or farro, barley, rice, or lentils), put those in too. Simmer until cooked to your liking.

3. Just before supper, add a chopped up apple. Smile and serve, with a dollop of sour cream if you wish.


Recipe from market shopper, Lorinda Moholt.

Pickled Shrimp and Celery

Sarah West

Shrimp season is on its way out - celebrate the last hauls of the year with this unique preparation. Not as acidic as most vinegar pickles, think of the brine as a marinade, infusing both ingredients with delicacy and aroma. Picked Dungenness crab would make a decadent substitute, though may fare better when tossed with the celery post-pickling (just before serving) to avoid a vinegar takeover of its buttery qualities.

Serve for the salad course or make it the main dish with a side of roasted sweet potatoes or delicata squash slices.


Serves 6 as a side dish

Ingredients

For the pickling brine
1/2 Cup rice wine vinegar
1/2 Cup mirin
2 Tablespoons sugar
2 Thick slices fresh ginger
5 Black peppercorns
5 Juniper berries
1 Cinnamon stick

2 Bunches celery, outer stalks removed until just the tender heart stalks and their blanched leaves remain
1 Cup white wine
8 Black peppercorns
2 Bay leaves
Salt
1 1/2 - 2 pounds shrimp
Really good extra-virgin olive oil
Pepper
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh chives


1. Put all of the pickling brine ingredients in a non-reactive pot along with one cup of water and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the sugar has dissolved. Pour the brine into a wide shallow dish. Can be make up to 1 week in advance. Keep refrigerated.

2. Keep the celery hearts whole and put them into a large pot with the wine, bay leaves, and a generous pinch of salt. Add just enough water to cover the celery. Cover and simmer over medium heat until the celery is crisp-tender when pierced with a knife, 25-30 minutes. Transfer the celery to a cutting board. Cut the hearts crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick pieces and add them to the pickling brine.

3. Using the same pot and liquid in which you cooked the celery, poach the shrimp until just cooked (if still in their shell, leave it on until after they are cooked to avoid them curling to tightly or flaring into a "butterfly"). Drain the shrimp in a colander, peel (if necessary), and put in a bowl. Pour the celery and pickling brine over the shrimp; make sure everything is submerged. If there isn't enough brine to cover everything completely, just give the celery and shrimp a turn now and then. Cover, refrigerate, and allow the shrimp and celery to "pickle" for about an hour.

4. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the shrimp and celery to plates. Drizzle with olive oil, season with salt and pepper, and garnish with celery leaves and chopped chives. Serve cold.



Based on a recipe from Canal House Cooks Every Day, by Christopher Hirsheimer & Melissa Hamilton.

Pear Tarte Tatin

Sarah West

This twist on the classic apple tarte tatin accentuates the pear's natural syrup by enveloping it in rich caramel. Frozen puff pastry means you can devote all of your concentration to getting the caramelized pears just right. Serve warm, or let sit for a few hours so the flavors can find their way into the pastry.

Serves 8

Ingredients

4 (2 1/2 pounds) Bosc pears, peeled, halved and cored
1 Cup sugar
1/4 cup unsalted butter, cut into small cubes
2 Tablespoons light corn or brown rice syrup
1 sheet puff pastry


1. Set oven to 375-degrees. Sprinkle sugar evenly over bottom of heavy 9-inch cake pan with 2-inch sides. Scatter butter cubes over sugar, then drizzle with corn rice syrup. Arrange pear halves in the sugar in an attractive circle, round bottoms at the edge, pointed tips at the center, and the hollow core side up with the rounded bottoms down on the sugar. Place pan in oven and bake for about 2 hours and 45 minutes, until they become candied orbs. Don't turn them or touch them, just leave them in the oven.

2. Cut a 9-inch circle from the puff pastry and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake in the same oven (at 375-degrees) for about 15 minutes, until the pastry disk is golden brown and puffed up like a pillow. Remove and let cool.

3. When the pears are cooked, the sugar has started to become caramel, and the juices from the pears have become part of the sugary caramel, remove the pan from the oven and place directly onto the stovetop burner. If the pears have lost too much liquid, pour a little warm liquid (apple cider or pear juice, if you have them, or just water) to help the caramel along. Over low heat, cook the syrup just a few minutes until big soapy bubbles form and the syrup becomes a true amber caramel. Remove from heat immediately.

4. Place the puff pastry pillow directly on top of the pears, domed-side down. It should fit snugly within the diameter of the cake pan. Place a clean sheet pan lined with parchement over the tatin and very carefully - but swiftly! - invert. Tap the pan to be sure all of the pears have dropped down, then carefully remove the cake pan.



Based on a recipe from Prune, by Gabrielle Hamilton.

Red Bell Pepper and Shallot Curry

Sarah West

Building a masala (curry) from scratch with fresh spices creates an intoxicating depth of flavor for minimal effort, and is one of the foundational techniques of Indian cooking. This curry dish makes the most of late season peppers and tomatoes and is a good starting place for cooks who are used to pre-ground curry blends, as it calls for a small and widely available set of spices.

If you don't have black mustard seeds, you can substitute yellow, but know that their flavor profile is quite different. It is worth seeking out black (sometimes also called brown) mustard seeds if you plan on making this and other masalas part of your repertoire. Black mustard's pungent kick ties the aromatic qualities of this dish (and many other Indian dishes) together in a way that yellow mustard just can't imitate.

Serve this curry with rice and a protein for a complete meal. It is also lovely over a bed of steamed potato chunks or with sauteed wild mushrooms added with the bell peppers. There is a good amount of pepper heat in this recipe as written, so scale back the chile peppers if you want to tone it down.


Serves 6 as a side dish

Ingredients

1 bunch green onions, white and green parts separated, chopped into thin rounds
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1 tablespoon whole cumin seeds
2 cups (11 oz) thinly sliced shallots
1 pound tomatoes, chopped
3 large jalapenos (or other chile peppers), finely chopped
1 tablespoon salt
1 teaspoon mild paprika
1 teaspoon freshly ground black mustard seeds (grind in a mortar and pestle or, if you don't have one, place in a plastic bag and pound with a rolling pin until coarsely ground)
3 to 4 red bell or sweet Italian peppers, seeded and chopped into 1/2-inch thick strips

1. Heat oil in a heavy, medium pot on medium-high for 30 seconds. Add the cumin seeds and allow them to sizzle for 30-45 seconds, or until they become darker brown. Immediately add shallots and the white parts of the green onions and saute for about 8 minutes, or until the shallots are soft and golden. Add tomatoes, chile peppers, salt, turmeric, paprika, and mustard seeds. Reduce the heat to medium and cook the masala for 10 minutes, or until oil separates and glistens on top.

2. Stir in the bell peppers and cook, covered, for 3-5 minutes, or until they reach your preferred texture. Stir in the green parts of the green onions and serve immediately.
Based on a recipe from Vij's at Home, by Meeru Dhalwala and Vikram Vij

Wild Mushroom and Herb Polenta

Sarah West

A quintessential fall recipe, pairing earthy wild mushrooms with the zesty brightness of fresh herbs, most of which will hang on until the first frost. Built like a pizza, this dish is easy to assemble and brings a touch of effortless elegance to the weeknight table. Serve with a salad of baby lettuces and frisee tossed in a light vinaigrette. 

Serves 2

Ingredients

4 Tablespoons olive oil
4 Cups wild mushrooms (chanterelles, porcini, hedgehog, etc.), brushed clean, large ones halved or even quartered
2 Garlic cloves, crushed
1 Tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon
1 Tablespoon chopped fresh thyme
1 Tablespoon truffle oil (optional - could also used truffle salt from Springwater Farm in place of regular salt)
Salt and black pepper
2 1/2 Cups stock (chicken or vegetable)
1/2 Cup polenta
3 oz Parmesan, grated
2 1/2 Tablespoons butter
1 Teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary
1 Tablespoon chopped chervil (sub parsley if unavailable)
4 oz soft-ripened cheese (such as Fraga Farm camembert or Willamette Valley Cheese brie), cut into thin slices

1. Heat half of the olive oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Once hot, add half of the mushrooms and fry just until cooked, 5-10 minutes; try not to move them much so you get golden-brown patches on their surface. Remove from the pan and repeat with the rest of the mushrooms and oil. Off the heat, return all the mushrooms to the pan and add the garlic, tarragon, thyme, truffle oil, and some salt and pepper. Keep warm.

2. Bring the stock to boil in a saucepan. Slowly stir in the polenta, then reduce the heat to the minimum and cook, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon. The polenta is ready when it leaves the sides of the pan but is still runny. If you are using instant polenta, this shouldn't take more than 5 minutes; with traditional polenta it could take up to 50 minutes (if it seems to dry out, add some more stock or water, but just enough to keep it at a thick porridge consistency).

3.  Preheat the broiler. When the polenta is ready, stir in the Parmesan, butter, rosemary and half the chervil. Season with salt and pepper. Spread the polenta over a heatproof dish and top with the soft-ripened cheese slices. Place under the broiler until the cheese bubbles. Remove, top with the mushrooms and their juices, and return to the broiler for a minute to warm up. Serve hot, garnished with the remaining chervil.


Based on a recipe from Plenty by Yotam Ottolenghi.

Summer's End Gratin

Sarah West

While you could make this recipe at any point during tomato-eggplant season, something about it calls out to the end of summer, when the chill that lingers in the shadows (or jumps right out and owns a whole day) makes you hungry for something comforting and warm. Any kind of eggplant works; to add a little more complexity to the preparation and the resulting flavor, grill the eggplant slices instead of sautéing.

I once cooked 1/2 pound ground lamb with the chard portion of this dish and found it highly satisfying. I've also used queso fresco or feta in place of mozzarella, and mustard greens instead of chard. Keeping the basic architecture the same, the fun part is tailoring the dish to the ingredients you have on hand and the flavors you like best. I imagine, once summer draws to a permanent close, that sliced delicata squash would make a nice substitute for the eggplant and canned whole tomatoes for the fresh ones.


Serves 4

Ingredients
1 1/2 pounds eggplant
Sea salt
Neutral vegetable oil (such as canola or grapeseed)
2 Tablespoons Olive oil
1 small finely diced onion
10-12 cups coarsely chopped chard leaves (about 1 pound)
Freshly ground pepper
Several large basil leaves, torn
1 or 2 large tomatoes, sliced 1/4-inch thick
4 oz. fresh mozzarella cheese, sliced
Handful of cherry tomatoes 
1 cup fresh bread crumbs

1. Slice the eggplants into rounds a scant 1/2-inch thick (you should have about 8-10 slices if using globe eggplant). Heat a ridged cast-iron pan over medium-high heat. While the pan is heating, brush both sides of each eggplant slice with neutral vegetable oil. When the pan is hot, add the slices and cook for 6 to 7 minutes, rotating them 45 degrees and cooking for another 5-7 minutes. Turn the slices over and cook on the second side the same way, though they may take less time. Alternately, brush the rounds with oil and bake in a 375-degree oven until soft and nicely colored, about 25 minutes.

2. Heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a wide skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, for three minutes. Add the chard and a few pinches of salt, cover, and cook until the chard is wilted and tender, 5 minutes or so. Turn the cooked chard into a colander set over a bowl and press with the back of a spoon to remove some of the liquid.

3. Heat the oven to 350-degrees. Lightly oil a round or oval gratin dish large enough to told 6-8 cups.

4. Cover the gratin dish with half the eggplant slices and season with salt and pepper. Scatter the basil, then layer half of the tomato slices on top, followed by half of the mozzarella. Season again with salt and pepper. Strew the chard over the cheese layer and season lightly with salt and pepper. Layer the remaining eggplant, followed by the remaining tomato, and cheese. Tuck any small whole tomatoes here and there among the vegetables.

5. Toss the bread crumbs with 1 tablespoon olive oil and strew them over the surface. Bake until bubbly and the bread crumbs are browned, about 35 minutes. Let settle 10 minutes or so before serving.

Based on a recipe from Deborah Madison's, Vegetable Literacy.

Green Mac & Cheese

Sarah West

I was inspired to make this after one of our volunteers brought something similar to a market potluck last year. I love the way the greens cut through the heaviness of homemade mac & cheese, making it seem (almost) healthy. During their brief spring appearance, I like to use nettles because their rich, nutty flavor pairs perfectly with cheese. Any greens will do: spinach, mustards, sorrel, kale, green onion tops, or even broccoli florets all make nice substitutes.  (Want to come to market potlucks? Inquire about volunteer opportunities at the info booth).

Nettles, while uniquely delicious and more nutritious than all other greens combined, come with one catch--they sting! Once boiled or steamed, nettles are perfectly safe to touch, but take care when handling raw leaves. Read more about handling and cooking with nettles here.

Ingredients:

1/2 - 3/4 lb nettles, boiled and drained
1 lb penne pasta (or your favorite shape)
8 tablespoons butter, divided
2 tablespoons white flour
1/2 cup milk
2 cups half & half
1 pinch red pepper flakes to taste
1 pinch black pepper to taste
1 pinch ground nutmeg to taste
1 tablespoon dry sherry (optional)
8 oz Gruyere cheese, grated
8 oz fontina cheese, grated
16 oz sharp cheddar cheese, grated, divided
1/2 cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
smoked paprika


1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9 x 13 inch glass baking dish with 1 tablespoon of butter and set aside. Blend nettles and half & half in a food processor and set aside.

2. Bring a medium saucepan of water to boil and add penne pasta. Boil 8-10 minutes. Pasta should be al dente. Remove from heat, run under cold water, drain and set aside.

3. Place a large heavy saucepan over medium heat, add 4 tablespoons of butter. When butter melts, whisk in flour, stirring as flour cooks a minute or two. Add milk, stirring constantly to avoid lumps. Then the sauce is smooth, add half & half, nettles mixture and continue to stir. Add red pepper, black pepper, nutmeg and sherry, stirring continuously. Add the three cheeses, reserving 1/2 C of sharp cheddar for later. Mix well until all of the cheese has melted and the sauce is consistently smooth. Remove from heat.

4. Add pasta to the pot of cheese sauce; stir until well mixed. Pour into prepared baking dish. Evenly sprinkle top of baking dish with reserved 1/2 C of sharp cheddar cheese. Cover with panko and dot with remaining butter. Sprinkle with smoked paprika.

5. Bake for 40-45 minutes, until bubbling and slightly brown on top. Let rest for 10 minutes before serving.

This recipe invites creativity: Reduce or increase the amount of greens to your own tastes. Substitute your favorite melty cheeses, or use just sharp cheddar. Skip the panko or use your own homemade bread crumbs. Change up the spices. Try stirring in lightly steamed, whole broccoli or cauliflower florets. Process raw leaves with the half & half instead of cooked for a brighter green (even nettles can be used raw, just be extra careful getting them into the blender).

Recipe adapted from the Hedgebrook Cookbook.

Cranberry Mostarda

Sarah West

makes 3 cups

This sweet-savory mustard fruit condiment is magic paired with roast turkey, ham, pork, chicken, duck, or goose. It also makes for a lovely accompaniment to a charcuterie or cheese plate. And I am at a loss for a better way to elevate leftovers to a more elegant sandwich than with to slather a spoonful of fruit mostarda over sliced turkey...except if maybe you added Ancient Heritage Dairy Adelle Cheese and some crisp market salad leaves along with!

Ingredients
1 pound fresh cranberries
2 cups granulated sugar
2 cups water
3 Tbsp. dry mustard (such as Colman’s)
1 Tbsp. black or brown mustard seeds
1 Tbsp. yellow mustard seeds
salt
the zest & juice of 1 orange

Steps

  1. In a small, heavy-bottomed pot, combine the cranberries with the sugar and water and bring to a simmer. Cook for several minutes, until the cranberries begin to burst.
  2. Mix the dry mustard powder with enough additional water to make a thin, pourable paste. Add the reconstituted mustard, along with the seeds, to the cranberries. Season the mixture with salt. Simmer, stirring now and then to prevent scorching, until the mixture has thickened (it should be the consistency of melted jam), about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat. Stir in the orange zest and juice. Allow to cool to room temperature.
  3. The mostarda will keep, in a sealed container in the refrigerator for a week.

Chef Kathryn Yeomans ~ The Farmer’s Feast
http://thefarmersfeast.me/ or visit The Farmer’s Feast on Facebook
Hillsdale Farmers’ Market’s Feed Me Fresh Cooking Class

 

Chimichurri

Sarah West

Chimichurri is a parsley-based sauce from Argentina. Look a lot like a liquid pesto, chimichurri is a great condiment for grilled meats, chicken and seafood. It's very easy to make and will keep for a few days. Enjoy!

Ingredients
1 cup firmly packed fresh flat-leaf parsley, trimmed of thick stems
5-6 garlic cloves
2 tablespoons fresh oregano (or 2 teaspoons dried oregano)
½ cup olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine or sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes

Steps
1. Finely chop (by hand or with a food processor) the parsley, fresh oregano, and garlic. Place in a small bowl.
2. Stir in the olive oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and red pepper flakes. Adjust seasonings.
3. Serve immediately or refrigerate. If chilled, return to room temperature before serving.