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Getting Here

The market is held held in the Wilson High - Rieke Elementary parking lot in Portland, Oregon. Parking is available at the north entrance located at SW Capitol Hwy and SW Sunset Blvd. Using GPS? The Hillsdale Food Cart Park's address, 6238 SW Capitol Hwy, Portland, OR 97239 will get you to the entrance. You can also use our map (link) to find the market. 

Parking at the SW Vermont St end of the market is very limited. Please do not park on the south side of SW Vermont St. It is now a bike lane and you may be ticketed.

 


View Hillsdale Farmers' Market in a larger map

Smoking is not permitted in the market or on Portland Public Schools property including the school parking lots.

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Market Mail
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Contact information

Hillsdale Farmers' Market
PO Box 80262
Portland OR 97280

phone
503-475-6555

email
contact@hillsdalefarmersmarket.com

 

The Hillsdale Farmers' Market is a year-round market running weekly from the first Sunday in May through the Sunday before Thanksgiving and twice monthly December through April.

Market Hours

10am - 2pm

2015 Sessions
Weekly May 3 - Nov 22
Dec 6 & 20


EBT, debit, credit cards accepted

We love animals but not inside the market. The safest place for your pet is at home. Thanks!

Thursday
Jun182015

Grapevine June 21 2015 Market

 

What's Coming to Market?

 


DeNoble's Farm Fresh returned to Hillsdale last Sunday with artichokes, fennel, white turnips, kohlrabi and other produce last week. Expect more this Sunday. Blueberries and cherries were abundant last week and will be again this Sunday. Strawberries will be limited. The June berries came early so their season is about over. The day neutral berries (Albion and Seascape) are just starting to produce the second crop. Raspberries and blackberries should be available as should apricots. Peaches started appearing in the mid-week markets. There should be limited amounts of peaches this Sunday. Check the market morning update on the website for updates.

Check the Availability Page for updates throughout the weekend. The page will be updated through Saturday evening. Check our Twitter feed for Sunday morning updates.

IN THIS WEEK
Blossom Vinegars
Carman Ranch

OUT
Live Local
Tastebud

GUEST VENDORS
Yolanda Collection

The Fat of The Land

Simple Food

Yesterday I spent three hours making beet burger mix. The said mix currently waits in my refrigerator for a busy evening when it will feel deliciously effortless to throw a couple patties in the hot skillet and sit down to a satisfying meal minutes later. What I know at this point is that those six patties took an average of thirty laborious minutes each: simmering the dry beans, cooking the brown rice just so, roasting then peeling then shredding then squeezing the beets, pulverizing oats to a fine flour, caramelizing then deglazing onions, processing some but not all of the beans, mixing the lot together in a bowl where it must sit (must!) for at least twenty-four hours before its burger magic can be activated. And although they come with many glowing recommendations, I don't yet know how they'll taste.

It was about the time that my hand was stained past my wrist in crimson beet juice, as I worked to release as much moisture as the recipe implored, that I had the thought of a simple hamburger (I am not vegetarian, though I do have a fanatical love of beets). My mind conjured the beefy kind of burger that has only salt and pepper mixed into its ground, maybe a few snippets of chives, then onto the grill it goes, onto the grilled buttered bun a few minutes later, a squeeze of mustard and a smear of mayonnaise, maybe a slice of tomato or onion, though all I really must have on my burger is pickles and a crisp lettuce leaf. How much better than that, I thought, could these beet burgers be?

It’s all a matter of perspective, of course. For a vegetarian who likes beets, the appeal is obvious. For those who enjoy a grilled patty of ground beef, three hours of work to create an approximation, even for a beet lover, does seem to beg the question: why bother? Why not throw a few slices of lightly oiled and salted, market-fresh beets onto the grill, let their sugars caramelize in the smoky heat, and call it a night?

Without a doubt, I love elaborate cooking. I do not flinch at a recipe, such as my sister and I tackled last Thanksgiving, that requires many hours of peeling and processing roasted chestnuts just to make a little wisp of a cake that is devoured in less than thirty minutes. I love cooking all day, making it all from scratch, watching the minutiae of an extravagant meal unfold and relishing each step like the lines of an exhilarating book.

But summer makes me sluggish in the kitchen. It’s a good thing that hot weather and vegetable bounty come hand-in-hand, because even the thought of a simple soup has me hesitating, weighing the costs of discomfort against the gains of pleasurable flavor. Summer’s mostly sweltering kitchen (you may have already deduced that my house has no AC) adds to the cost, and the plethora of fresh, flavorful produce detracts from any benefit complex cooking may offer.

So it is with simple food that I while away my summer. Nearly half of our cooking takes place on the grill, our summer oven where we roast every kind of vegetable, cook flatbreads and pizzas, sear peaches or pork chops, and occasionally throw down a patty of ground beef, all without raising the temperature in which we must attempt to sleep.

Indoor cooking amounts to variations in chopping, tossing salads, simmering grains, steaming spuds, or briefly sautéing sweet chunks of summer squash and fresh onions. Summer’s flavors are uncomplicated and light. Too much flame or fuss makes their perky crunch go soft. My goal in the kitchen is not to transform, but to preserve—with the judicious use of salt and pepper, citrus or vinegar, and aromatics from the herb patch—all the delicate, inimitable flavors that the sun and soil and farmhands have already cooked up.

Sarah West is a gardener, eater and admirer of the agricultural arts. She gladly spends her Sundays as assistant manager of the Hillsdale Farmers’ Market, basking in the richness of its producers’ bounty and its community’s energy. Find archives and more at http://thefatofthelandblog.wordpress.com.

Simple Technique
Here’s a roundup of recipes to help you perfect the basic techniques of simple summer cooking:
Grilling – Become a meatless grill-master with this A-to-Z guide to grilling vegetables (link).
Chopping – Cook with your knife to make this refreshing Chopped Salad with Feta, Lime, and Mint (link).
Steaming – Make a Summer Aoli Feast (link) to celebrate the lightly steamed flavors of peak-season market veggies.
Sautéing – Master the art of the simple sauté with this easy to follow guide (link).
Pickling – Employ brine, your refrigerator, and time to soften and season your favorite summer vegetables. Check out this simple method of making fridge pickles without a recipe (link).
Raw – Stick with flavors nature’s way, then ribbon, rice, puree, or toss using this basic guide to raw cooking (link).